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SULLA CRISI DELLA DEMOCRAZIA IN EUROPA

Il mio intervento di ieri in aula all'assemblea parlamentare del Consiglio d'Europa, a Strasburgo, sulla crisi della democrazia in Europa:

2012 ORDINARY SESSION

PARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE

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(Third part)

REPORT

Twenty-third Sitting

Wednesday 27 June 2012 at 10 a.m.

3. Joint debate – Democracy at risk: the role of citizens and of the State today: (i) The crisis of democracy and the role of the state in today’s Europe; (ii) The portrayal of migrants and refugees during election campaigns

Ms MOGHERINI REBESANI (Italy) – All around Europe, there are two paradoxes facing our democracies. On the one side, globalisation and the financial crisis have unveiled the urgent and absolute need for global political action. A couple of decades ago, we used to say that we should think globally and act locally. It is now clear to everybody that this is not enough: we have to think globally but act locally and globally as well. We need global levels of institutional co-operation and global political actors – although I should say that civil society, youth movements and international non-governmental organisations sometimes seem far more ready to act in this way than political parties. On the other side of the paradox, opinion polls and electoral trends show that people seem to be afraid of delegating national sovereignty – look at the European Union debate. There has also been an increase in populist discourse and localist movements, yet often, those citizens who declare that globalisation is the context in which politics should take place are the same ones who vote for localist parties or movements.

In these times of economic crisis, we are facing conditions where political leaders and parties know exactly what should be done. Let us take the example of immigration. We all know very well that immigration is not only unstoppable but necessary, if we want our economies and welfare systems to be sustainable. On the other side, we have to win elections, and sometimes long-term and global thinking is compromised by the short-term electoral message. This is the second paradox that we are facing in our democracies. I will put it in a brutal way: has democracy become part of the problem rather than part of the solution? This is the implication when you look at Greece – or, sometimes, at Italy. Our elections are a time of problems rather than a time of participation.

The answer is to open up participation. On the one side, we need a different kind of participation – earlier, someone talked about horizontal or interactive participation – but on the other side, we need to exercise responsibility, as was mentioned just now. Electorates ask political parties to take responsibility, speak the truth and deliver results. This is what we have to do. The only solution is transparency in politics and institutions, and opening up political parties, making them effective and efficient instruments for participation, at the service of their communities and countries through delivering results. Only in this way will we save our democracies from these paradoxes.

Pubblicato il 28/6/2012 alle 13.32 nella rubrica Sull' Europa.

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